Are you a masochistic film junkie? You’re going to love these.

If you’re like me, and you enjoy watching films that are difficult to sit through, you’re going to love Flavorwire’s list of 25 Incredibly Tough Movies for Extreme Viewers.

Of the films I have seen from this list, I would highly recommend Michael Haneke’s Funny Games and The Piano Teacher, Lars Von Trier’s Antichrist, and Stanley Kubrik’s A Clockwork Orange. It’s funny because there are few films here that I didn’t find too difficult to watch (SevenOldboy, even A Serbian Film), and a few films I felt like were missing (Dogtooth, Dario Argento films, Cache) on this list.

Do you agree with Flavorwire’s list or should they make room for a few others?

An afterthought on Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death

On February 2nd, 2014, I got a text message, which prompted a Google search, and the first headline that came up confirmed that Philip Seymour Hoffman had indeed been found dead in his apartment in West Village. I remember staring out the window and thinking that’s not too far from our apartment here in New York City.

In the days following, I saw shared news stories on my Facebook feed. Fifty Bags of Heroin found in Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Apartment. I saw links reblogged on Tumblr. Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Death Saves 10 Lives. People were dealing with the shock by connecting with fellow social media users, strangers, and anonymous fans of the actor.

The headlines weren’t really enough for me to follow through with a click of my mouse, but I did read one article by A.O.Scott. After reading the article, I wanted to watch Philip Seymour Hoffman’s work. As a kid I had seen him in Twister and Patch Adams, as a teen I saw him in The Talented Mr. RipleyThe Big LebowskiPunch Drunk LoveAlmost Famous, and more recently, I had seen him in The Master. And yet, I felt like I was missing out on a plethora of Philip Seymour Hoffman characters.

I guess I felt a compulsion to see his earlier work, because I felt like this might be the best way to honor deceased artists. They continue to live on in what they leave behind. And I really believe Philip Seymour Hoffman left us with immortalized performances.

2014 Sundance TIn Type Portraits - Philip Seymour Hoffman

Films From 2013 Condensed

This is why I love film.

Someone has gone ahead and spliced together scenes from 300 films this year into one condensed 7 minute film. The result is absolutely mesmerizing. The effort this person must have put into editing this work is pretty impressive, but what’s more impressive, is their ability to show us the themes and ideas that hold all of these disparate films together. It reminds us why we go to see movies in the first place, and why we’re so addicted to their pull.

Fruity Film

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This is a passionfruit. It has gone through an MRI machine, and these are the images that have come as a result of its journey.

To me, they kind of look like trippy effects on film. It’s as though something comes to life when these ordinary fruit and vegetable are put behind a particular lens. They take on hypnotic movements, full of life and energy for a moment in time. Makes you want to eat more fruit and vegetables, in my opinion.

For more weird and whacky fruity/vegetably “films”, check out http://insideinsides.blogspot.com/

 

 

The brief hiatus of sorts

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I went through a short hiatus recently because of an overload of work at work, freelance writing, and well, movie watching. In the meantime, I have seen The Great GatsbyBadlandsWreck-it Ralph and the first five minutes of every bad Netflix film I had the misfortune of clicking on.

Apologies.

In other news, I have been working on editing my Super 8 film! Some time last year, I made a Super 8 film at 3rdward in Brooklyn, and it has taken me forever to haul my ass over to PacLab and get it transferred digitally. Some of the film was sadly damaged, but what’s saved of the film is truly beautiful.

Suffice to say, I am still stuck in some work-related stuff, but thefilmkid will be back.

Please stand by.